Best of OBI 2016

My News years resolution is to stop using spray deodorants.

Roll on 2017

So that was an interesting year!
If you ignore all the celebrity deaths, the Brexit, Wars, BI companies imploding, OTN mixing things up a bit, and the rise of the robot, then 2016 was actually a good year for analytics. Not that you would know, because all the magpies have moved onto the next shiney thing.  but look:

  • OBIEE 12c is actually quite good.  Worth upgrading to, and learning about oPatch and DV (or is that VA?).  It installs well, it runs OK and it looks good – Unlike me!
  • OBIEE Books sales were still strong,
  • The limited number of OBIEE related conference talks available were all well subscribed.
  • Companies still need decent Analytics
  • Apex and OBIEE are now best friends

So what is the next shiney thing ?  It’s irrelevant! to me anyway, because I am sticking to my friend OBIEE.  He has served us well for 16 years, and will continue to serve us in 2017.  Don’t forget people – All that glitters is not always gold.

Keep learning OBIEE and keep your customers happy using all those lovely features that you already have, but dont yet know how to use – Database Analytics, Actionable Intelligence, fully interactive

 

If I had one message for the new year – FREE THE DATA.  Get stuck into a Self service model – stop being like IT and start being like entrepreneurs.  Stop messing about with releases, and documentation and testing, and MUD and deploying into god knows which environment, and get on with really delivering, fast useful analytics.  Stop worrying about how things look and start producing intelligent results – stuff that will make the customer happy, because they can make productiove decisions.

Rant over.

 

Enjoy the New Year – Its going to be GREAT!

 

Read these…

blogBlogs of the year

  1. How It’ll Go Down – Upgrading OBIEE 11g to 12c

Neil Achord said, “What are you in for when migrating from OBIEE 11g to 12c? Short answer is there is a lot less pain going from 11g to 12c than there was going from OBIEE 10g to 11g. The upgrade to 12c is an out of place upgrade as was the 10g to 11g which means new software install followed by migrating/upgrading 11g artifacts (web catalog, RPD file and permisssion) to the 12c versions.

If you’re new to these upgrades, here is a super-short outline:

  • Check Software/Hardware Pre-requisites.
  • Install the OBIEE 12c software.
  • Export/migrate the 11g artifacts in the form of an export bundle.
  • Import the export bundle from the 11g system into the 12c system.
  • Test everything out in 12c.
  • Re-mediate any conversion issues.
  • Go Live

2. Art of BI: BITeamwork API In Action – Calling Basic Interactions

Christian Screen looks at the BITeamwork API in action, calling basic interactions for launching the cell annotation process and the dashboard comment editor.

3. OBIEE12c – Pushing-Up Daisies … or more Relevant than Ever in the World of BiModal IT

Mark Rittman shares the slides from his talk “Oracle BI Hybrid BI : Mode 1 + Mode 2, Cloud + On-Premise Business Analytics”

4. WELCOME TO OBIEE 12C – SCRIPTING BAR FILE BACKUPS

Paul Cannon refers to a previous blog and says, “A few months ago I wrote a blog on using BI Application Archive (BAR) files to back up the RPD, web catalog and security model from an OBIEE instance. Since then I’ve been asked by a client how this could be scripted for a regular schedule to run.”

5. Oracle ACE. What Does That Mean?

Michael Rainey asks this question…He shares his journey to becoming an Oracle Ace and says, “I knew deep down, but without really knowing, that an Oracle ACE was something I wanted to become.”

“It’s hard work. It’s not for everyone. But for those of us who choose to put in that effort, I believe it’s a great honor that we’re recognized by Oracle.”

6. Forecast: Partly Cloudy (Part 1)

Phil Goerdt blogs, “One thing that is for certain is that the cloud is here to stay. With more and more offerings having a cloud component, managing data and applications that are not on-premises will become commonplace. Some applications are optimized for this brave new world we’re living in (Oracle BICS comes to mind), but the old guard still remains, and we will need to be ready for integrating these new technologies into the old. In this series of blogs, I’ll walk through two cloud based data sources that I recently connected to OBIEE 11.1.1.7 on Windows VMs.”

7. My Favourite Things

Pete Scott writes, “Apart from the obligatory “raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens” I must also add analytic functions to my list, and one function in particular, FIRST_VALUE (oh, and its almost identical twin LAST_VALUE.)”

8. Oracle SQLcl, Why?

Jeff Smith actually says, “Why Not??”

9. What should I know about SQL?

Scott Wesley bases this blog post on a question asked on twitter:

“What three things do you think every developer must know about #SQL ?”

and lists the best (in his opinion) responses.

10. Art of BI: Turn your OBIEE Sample App VM into a Development Environment

Sherry Milad asks, “How do you turn your OBIEE Sample App VM into a Development Environment?”

She goes through:

  • Steps to create a Shared Folder
  • Steps to setup ODBC connections
  • Steps to upload the development RPD
  • Steps to loading the development Web Catalog
  • Steps to log into Catalog Manager

and then we’re ready!

11. Groovy, Web Services and OBIEE12c

Stewart Bryson writes, “If you’ve followed me for any length of time, you know I’m a fan of the Groovy language. It’s unfettered support for closures has made it a popular choice for writing domain-specific language (DSL) projects such as Gradle and Jenkins, and the healthy dose of syntactic sugar spooned in at runtime means that developers spend less time boiler-plating and more time implementing.”

12. Adaptive Mayhem

Jonathan Lewis blogs about when you run a query and it gives you a plan with a note that says “This is an adaptive plan”.  He refers to this blog and this blog series.

 

My mate got one of those Dyson Ball Cleaners for Christmas. Unfortunately, he misunderstood what it was, which is why he’s now in hospital.